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JAMES BAMA
We represent the entire collection of JAMES BAMA .
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All works listed chronologically.
Prices in USD

BIOGRAPHY


Chronological Index to James Bama Art

( 2012 - 1992 ) ____ ( 1991 - 1981 ) ____ ( 1980 - 1974 )

 

James Bama Chuck Wagon in the Snow

" CHUCK WAGON IN THE SNOW "
James Bama

95 s/n Giclee Canvas
13" x 15"
Email-price

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

James Bama Indian

" INDIAN RODEO PERFORMER "
James Bama

75 s/n Giclee Canvas
15" x 12"
Email-price

 

 

 

 

 

 

James bama North Cheyenne Wolf Scout

" NORTH CHEYENNE WOLF SCOUT "
James Bama

75 s/n Giclee Canvas
22" x 14"
Email-price

 

 

 

 

 

 

James Bama Sage Grinder

" SAGE GRINDER "
James Bama

75 s/n Giclee Canvas
14" x 18"
Email-price

 

 

 

 

 

 

James bama Holy man Holy City

" HOLY MAN - HOLY CITY "
James Bama

75 s/n Giclee Canvas
18" x 23"
Email-price

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

James Bama Little Star

" LITTLE STAR "
James Bama

75 s/n Giclee Canvas
16" x 12"
Email-price

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

James Bama Buffalo Bill 4th Of July

" BUFFALO BILL - 4TH OF JULY "
James Bama

75 s/n Giclee Canvas
18" x 18"
Email-price

 

 

 




 

 

JAMES BAMA - JAN. 2009

James Bama Crow Indian With Peace Pipe

" CROW INDIAN WITH PEACE PIPE "

75 s/n Giclee Canvas
17" x 21"
Email-price

James Bama met Henry Bright Wings during a medicine
ceremony performed in the tepee of a Crow medicine man
in Wyola, Montana. He was then 68. Bama liked his classic face,
which he thought would have been appropriate on a buffalo nickel.
When Bright Wings visited Old Trail Town in Cody, Wyoming
several years later, Bama dressed him in historical costume
including a pre-1900 headdress and a very old buffalo robe from
the Old Trail Town Museum in Cody.
In earlier times the right to wear a headdress had to be earned,
usually in battle. Today even women and children sometimes
wear a showy nontraditional war bonnet for pow-wow dance
parades and celebrations. Many men feel that their age is
entitlement enough, but others will not wear a headdress
because they do not consider it their proper. Bama met a
Pine Ridge Reservation Indian who would not pose in a
headdress even though he was 45 years old and certainly looked
venerable enough. During the Indian Wars of the post-Civil
War years, Bright Wings’ people, the Crows, frequently
allied themselves with the military against such traditional
enemies as the Sioux and the Cheyenne. Crow scouts rode to
their deaths with Custer.

 


 

JAMES BAMA - OCT. 2008

James Bama 1880's

" 1880's STILL LIFE OF SADDLE & RIFLE "

75 s/n Giclee Canvas
9" x 16"
$295

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

JAMES BAMA - SEPT. 2008

James Bama Heritage

" HERITAGE "

100 s/n Giclee Canvas 20" x 20" Email-price
1500 s/n Paper 20.5" x 20.5" Email-price

Though Lloyd Chavez is a Mountain Ute, he poses here with
traditional Shoshone Indian accoutrements. Artist James Bama
found him to be a particularly striking model and painted him
four times over the years, here with a sparrow hawk tied in his
hair, a seashell necklace draped across his neck and a deerskin
quiver slung across his back. The animal hide stretched behind
Chavez is covered in paintings depicting Indian dances, a
buffalo hunt and a captured American flag.

In the absence
of a written language, such paintings recorded events in the
life of an individual or family. Sometimes the paintings were
done in calendar style, visually recounting the highlights of
each passing year. The paintings often decorated a warrior’s
tepee, so that all who passed could recognize the great
deeds of the warrior within.

 

 

 

 

JAMES BAMA - OCT. 2008

James Bama - The Pawnee

" THE PAWNEE "

125 s/n Giclee Canvas
15" x 19"
Email-price

James Bama has derived a great deal of joy from the friendships
he has developed with many of the Native American subjects
of his portraits. Years ago, he discovered that on a personal level,
they are often very different from the confrontational image
they often project. For example, Wes Studi, a full-blooded
Cherokee, established an impressive screen-acting career with
his intense portrayals of a Pawnee war-party leader in Dances
with Wolves and as the vengeful Magua in The Last of the
Mohicans, yet Bama found him genial and obliging. During their
visits to the Bama home, Studi and his children often spent
happy hours playing basketball with the artist and his son.
The cultural gap was bridgedas two fathers enjoyed time
with their children.

JAMES BAMA - MAR. 2008

James Bama - Pow-wow Singer

" POW-WOW SINGER "

75 s/n Giclee Canvas
11" x 11"
Email-price

Pow-wow participants pride themselves on the finest of
regalia, particularly for the dances and parades. In their
workday lives, the participants may be clerks in a supermarket
or gas station attendants. For one day each year, however,
they are resplendent in buckskin and beadwork, in bright
feathers and blankets more colorful than were known by
the ancestors they revere and whose image they set out
to create. This evocative piece follows on the heels of
Bama's wildly successful Pow-Wow Dancer, which
is Sold Out at Publisher.

 

 

JAMES BAMA - JAN. 2008

James Bama - Buffalo In Storm

" BUFFALO IN STORM "

100 s/n Giclee Canvas
25" x 14"

Email-price

Ask James Bama why he went into Western art and he will tell
you quite plainly: he didn’t. “Norman Rockwell lived in New
England and so he painted small town scenes and harbors.
I happen to live out West, so I paint the Indians, ranchers
and landscapes I see.” Bama’s portraits of today’s denizens
of the West are thoroughly modern, but their occupations,
dress and spirit echo those of their predecessors centuries ago.
More than any other animal, the buffalo embodies the rugged
tenacity required to survive on the frontier.The day Bama
encountered this buffalo, the snow was fourteen inches
deep and the animal’s coat and hooves were crusted with ice,
but still the animal ventured on.This evocative winter scene
follows in the footsteps of the immensely successful
Chuck Wagon in the Snow; Old Saddle in the Snow
and Old Sod House.


 

JAMES BAMA - OCT. 2007

James bama Pow-Wow Dancer

" POW-WOW DANCER "

75 s/n Giclee Canvas
25" x 15"
Email-price

“This pow-wow dancer and his wife were hired to dance
on Native American Day at the Buffalo Bill Historical Center
in Cody, Wyoming. The museum staff told me about this
great-looking guy. He agreed to pose for me and I photographed
him right in front of the museum.”
James Bama’s modern realism approaches the larger-than-life
romance of the West from a new angle. The subjects of his
portraits are real people, doing real work, with the history
of generations past written in their faces and the
surrounding landscapes.

JAMES BAMA - SEPT. 2007

James Bama - Young Indian Dancer

" YOUNG INDIAN DANCER "

75 s/n Giclee Canvas
12" x 9"

Email-price

This boy is one of four Arapaho brothers who danced at
a festival. From the badges on his shirt (hand-made from
snapshots of his family) to the unique markings on his face,
the young dancer is a perfect example of Native American
youth today. Young Indian Dancer is a natural partner to
Indian Boy at Crow Fair, Bama’s last SmallWorkTM,
which featured another of the four dancing brothers.

 

 

JAMES BAMA - MAY 2007

James Bama - Heading for the High Ground

" HEADING FOR THE HIGH GROUND "

100 s/n Giclee Canvas
18" x 24"

Email-price

To create the scene that would become Heading for Higher Ground,
artist James Bama called upon his friend Jim
Williams.
Williams, says Bama, is a “real modern-day mountain man.
He used to trap and he lived in the Southwest in a cave.
He had an old-fashioned porcelain bathtub and all that you
would expect. He’s a terrific guy.” With Williams signed on to
model for the painting, they traveled to nearby Rimrock Dude
Ranch to borrow a horse for the day.
James Bama’s portraits of the denizens of the Southwest are
renowned for their touching combination of Old West valor
and modern reality. With Heading for Higher Ground,
Bama hearkens back to both a legendary time, and a time
that could have been only yesterday.

 

JAMES BAMA - APRIL 2007

James Bama Indian Boy At Crow Fair

" INDIAN BOY AT CROW FAIR "

75 s/n Giclee Canvas
13" x 9"

Email-price

Crow Fair, held every summer, comprises the largest annual gathering of North American Indians. It lasts for five days and is attended by some ten thousand Indians who set up a thousand tepees. There are parades, rodeo events and horseracing. Drumming and dancing continue far into the early morning hours.
This boy was one of four Arapaho brothers from the Wind River reservation who danced at the fair. His distinctive costume and face paint represent his personal creativity and individual style.

 

 

JAMES BAMA - OCT. 2006

James Bama - Black Elk's Great Grandson

" BLACK ELK'S GREAT GRANDSON "

100 s/n Giclee Canvas
20" x 20"

Email-price

Clifton DeSerca, a Sioux, lives and works in the modern world but has strong ties to the last days of the free-roaming horseback Native American of the plains. His great-grandfather was Black Elk, a Sioux holy man whose autobiography is considered one of the most important pieces of Native American literature. As a young man, Black Elk participated in the battle of the Little Big Horn. In his older years, he told his story to John G. Neihardt who translated it into the classic Black Elk Speaks. DeSerca serves his people by being involved in a reservation outreach program working with alcoholics. He is portrayed here wearing a Sioux headdress and a historic shirt from the trading-post period.

 

 

JAMES BAMA - MAY 2006

James Bama - Contemporary Sioux Indian

"CONTEMPORARY SIOUX INDIAN "

150 s/n Giclee Canvas 20" x 30" Email-price
1000 s/n Paper 19" x 29" Email-price

The distinctive portraits of James Bama have earned him the respect of art collectors and critics worldwide. The focus of Contemporary Sioux Indian is Oglala Sioux Wendy Irving, a modern-day Indian whose choker necklace, ribbon shirt and braids wrapped in otter skin indicate that he clings to the traditions of his people, yet finds himself caught between two worlds. To give the painting a contemporary flavor Bama placed him against a peeling wall that warns, "No Parking, Violators Towed Away," suggesting that the Indian does not fit in the white man's affluent neighborhood." These are sophisticated young Indians, very aware of what is going on," says Bama." They are not about to sit back passively and endure injustices. They seem limited in what they can do other than become educated and find a niche in the white man's world where their old ways have been accorded little or no place."

 

JAMES BAMA - FEB. 2006

James Bama - Waiting for the Grand Entry

" WAITING FOR THE GRAND ENTRY "

150 s/n Giclee Canvas
23" x 18"

Email-price

Every rodeo begins with a grand entry as the contestants and other riders follow the flag bearers in a serpentine course across the arena. At a junior rodeo in Cody, artist James Bama spotted Kenny Claybaugh waiting for the grand entry and was struck by the colorful combination of the yellow slicker, American flag and the dark glasses. Regarded as one of the sport’s top pickup men, Claybaugh worked the National Finals Rodeo in Las Vegas, Nevada, among many others. It is the pickup man’s duty to rescue a rider from a pitching bronc after the required seconds have elapsed and the horn is blown to signal a completed ride. It is a highly responsible task demanding skill and nerve, as a misstep can result in a rider’s falling and perhaps being trampled or slammed against an ungiving fence.The pickup horse must also be well trained so that it does not fear moving in close to the bronc’s flying hoofs and does not shy away as pickup man and bronc rider reach for one another.

 

JAMES BAMA - OCT. 2005

James Bama Buck Norris

" BUCK NORRIS - CROSS SABRES RANCH "

150 s/n Giclee Canvas 20" x 20" Email-price
1000 s/n Paper 19" x 19" Email-price


“Wyoming, the Cowboy State, conjures images of wide open spaces, cattle ranches, wild mustangs and rugged men in boots and Stetsons,” says artist James Bama.“I had known Buck Norris for many years, he was a strong, quiet man who worked with his parents, owners of the oldest ranch on the North Fork of the Shoshone River west of Cody.The day I finally visited this cowboy and trapper to use him as a model, it
snowed three feet. With the snow filling up the corral around him, he carried the tools of his trade: a leather saddle fitted with saddle bags, fringe-decorated bridle, coiled lariat and silver-dollar size spurs.These, the clothes on his back, and, of course, his horse, were sometimes the only possessions a cowboy of the Old West owned.”

 

 

 

JAMES BAMA - JUNE 2005

James Bama Bittin' Up Rimrock Ranch

" BITTIN' UP RIMROCK RANCH "

150 s/n Giclee Canvas 20" x 20" Email-price
1250 s/n Paper 19" x 19" Email-price

At Wyoming’s Rimrock Ranch, cowboys and their horses look much the way they did back in the Wild West of Laramie and Cheyenne. Scouting for portrait models, artist James Bama first met ranch hand Greg Laughen in the summer, when the young man’s hat, shirt and jeans were still crisp and new. At the time, Bama offered to take his picture, but the cowboy didn’t feel right – he thought he looked too much like a city slicker. By December, Laughen’s clothes were broken in enough that he felt ready to be photographed. He was teaching a young buckskin its first lessons in responding to the rein. Shortly, he would lead the horse by its makeshift rope bridle into the corral to prepare him for “bittin’ up,” taking the bit without rearing its head. Patiently, the ranch hand has taught the buckskin to take the saddle and to keep calm when men approach. Now his student is ready for a new lesson in horse sense.

 

 

 

JAMES BAMA - FEB. 2005

James Bama Young Plains Indian

" YOUNG PLAINS INDIAN "

150 s/n Giclee Canvas 24" x 24" Email-price
1500 s/n Paper 22" x 22.5" Email-price

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

JAMES BAMA - JULY 2001

James Bama Teamster

" THE TEAMSTER "

POSTER
25.5" x 20"

$30

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

JAMES BAMA - AUG. 1996

James Bama The Warrior

" THE WARRIOR "

200 s/n Paper
13.125" x 9"

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JAMES BAMA - JAN. 1996

James Bama Cheyenne

" CHEYENNE SPLIT HORN
HEADDRESS "

200 s/n Paper
26" x 13.75"

Email-price

 

 

 

 

 

JAMES BAMA - OCT. 1995

James Bama Blackfoot Ceremonial

" BLACKFOOT CEREMONIAL
HEADDRESS "

200 s/n Paper
30" x 16"

Email-price

 

 

 

 

 

JAMES BAMA - MAY 1995

James Bama A Cowboy Named Anne

" A COWBOY NAMED ANNE "

1000 s/n Paper
18.75" x 11.5"

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JAMES BAMA - FEB. 1995

James Bama Ready To Ride

" READY TO RIDE "

1000 s/n Paper
18.75" x 12.5"

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JAMES BAMA - OCT. 1994

James Bama Cheyenne Dog Soldier

" CHEYENNE DOG SOLDIER "

1000 s/n Paper
27.75" x 18.625"

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JAMES BAMA - MARCH 1994

James Bama Slim Warren

" SLIM WARREN THE OLD COWBOY "

1000 s/n Paper
12" x 8.875"

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JAMES BAMA - DEC. 1993

James Bama On The North Fork Of The Shoshoni

" ON THE NORTH FORK OF THE SHOSHONI "

1000 s/n Paper
19" x 19"

Email-price

 

 

 

 

 

 

JAMES BAMA - JULY 1993

James

" THE BUFFALO DANCE "

1000 s/n Paper
20" x 16"

Email-price

 

 

 

 

 

 

JAMES BAMA - MAY 1995

James Bama Wes

" WES STUDI AS MAGUA "

1000 s/n Paper
21.75" x 13.75"

Email-price

 

 

 

 

 

 

JAMES BAMA - JAN. 1993

James bama Making Horse Medicine

" MAKING HORSE MEDICINE "

1000 s/n Paper
19.125" x 23"

Email-price

 

 

 

 

 

 

JAMES BAMA - NOV. 1992

James bama Sioux Subchief

" SIOUX SUBCHIEF "

1000 s/n Paper
21.25" x 13.25"

Email-price

 

 

 

 

 

 

JAMES BAMA - OCT. 1992

James bama Blackfeet War Robe

" BLACKFEET WAR ROBE "

1000 s/n Paper
21.25" x 13.25"

Email-price

 

 

 

 

 

 

JAMES BAMA - SEPT. 1992

James Bama Coming Round The Bend

" COMING ROUND THE BEND "

1000 s/n Paper
12.25" x 22"

Email-price

 

 

 

 

 

JAMES BAMA - APRIL 1992

James bama Northern Cheyenne Wolf Scout

" NORTHERN CHEYENNE WOLF SCOUT "

1000 s/n Paper
21" x 13.5"

Email-price

 

 

 

 

 

 

JAMES BAMA - APRIL 1992

James Bama Crow Cavalry Scout

" CROW CAVALRY SCOUT "

1000 s/n Paper
21.25" x 13.5"

Email-price

 

 

 

 

Chronological Index to James Bama Art

( 2009 - 1992 ) ____ ( 1991 - 1981 )
____ ( 1980 - 1974 )

 

 

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