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LEN KRENZLER
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Len Krenzler - Operation Varsity_Crossing the Rhine

" OPERATION VARSITY - CROSSING THE RHINE "
Len Krenzler

245 Signed & Numbered Paper 18" x 30" Email for Price
95 Signed & Numbered Giclee Canvas 20" x 36" Email for Price
35 Signed & Numbered Giclee Canvas 28" x 50" Email for Price

 

Signed by Harry Hardy, Angus Scott, Ted Smith,
Robert Spooner and Jim Wallwork

Typhoons attack during Operation Varsity to aid in crossing the Rhine river.
The Hawker Typhoon fighter/bomber was a replacement for the Hurricane
which had been surpassed in performance by the Focke Wulf and other
advanced German fighters. It was designed to be very strong and carry
a powerful punch. Canadian Typhoons carried bombs and British Typhoons
carried rockets. The Typhoon could carry 2, 1000 pound bombs (compared
to very small 250 pound bombs carried by the Spitfire) and was also the
fastest piston engine fighter at the time at low level. It had an amazing
24 cylinder Napier Sabre engine that produced 2,200 horsepower, had
a maximum speed of 412mph and carried 4 huge 20mm canon! The
Typhoon was a truly powerful fighter!

The Typhoon did experience some technical difficulties because of its
complexity and high speed but the tremendous performance at low level
was well appreciated by the pilots that flew those perilous missions at
low altitude. Because of its close support role, losses were high and
Typhoon pilots faced scary odds. Over 151 brave men were lost in the
battle of Normandy alone. In all 666 pilots and 21 ground crew
lost their lives in WWII.

The Horsa and Hamilcar gliders were a key part of this mission. Gliders
carried troops or armored vehicles and were towed into the air by Halifax
bombers. Horsa gliders could carry 25 troops and Hamilcar gliders
could carry a tank. When within range of their objective they were
released on a one way mission. It was then up to the incredible skill
of the pilot and fighting strength of the airborne troops within to
capture their objective and remain alive until the advancing front line
arrived at their position. A scary prospect indeed!

 

In Len Krenzler's words,

" I would like to share my experience with one of the greatest men I’ve ever met. While searching for Typhoon pilot veterans for a new art project, a friend recommended Harry Hardy (second from the left). What a fortunate find he was.With RemembranceWith Remembrance Day approaching I thought I would like to share my experience with one of the greatest men I’ve ever met. While searching for Typhoon pilot veterans for a new art project, a friend recommended Harry Hardy (second from the left). What a fortunate find he was.

With Remembrance Day approaching I thought I would like to share my experience with one of the greatest men I’ve ever met. While searching for Typhoon pilot veterans for a new art project, a friend recommended Harry Hardy (second from the left). What a fortunate find he was.

He spoke with me on the phone for hours helping define what one of these missions was like and sent loads priceless information by mail. He knew I had no money at the time for travel so he and four of his comrades jumped in a van and drove all the way from Vancouver to Edmonton to see the work in progress. They spent an entire evening helping me visualize what such a battle was like.

A year later when the project was finally complete Harry invited me to a Barbecue on Vancouver Island where all of the remaining Typhoon veterans on the west coast would gather. He invited me to stay at his home in Vancouver and together we drove his ‘70’s station wagon, which had over 750,000 km on it, to the ferry terminal. It ran beautifully. The Barbecue with all those incredible heroes was unforgettable.

I’ll always remember Harry’s sense of humour. You could not be around Harry for more than a minute without laughing. When we arrived, one of the gentlemen who was supposed to be there was not. Someone informed Harry that he had passed away. Harry thought for a moment and then said “Oh…I guess we’ll excuse him then. But that’s the only excuse I’ll accept.”

Harry flew 96 combat missions in the Typhoon, far more than he was required to fly. His reasoning was that the most dangerous ones were the first few so he would not endanger some new pilot when he could do it. He was not only a great warrior but a great engineer who added several successful patents to his name after the war.

The last time I spoke with Harry he was complaining that he didn’t have a girlfriend anymore and that he was off to the legion to find one.

Harry left us this year but he left the world in a better place than he found it. Farewell Harry, you are missed.He spoke with me on the phone for hours helping define what one of these missions was like and sent loads priceless information by mail. He knew I had no money at the time for travel so he and four of his comrades jumped in a van and drove all the way from Vancouver to Edmonton to see the work in progress. They spent an entire evening helping me visualize what such a battle was like.

A year later when the project was finally complete Harry invited me to a Barbecue on Vancouver Island where all of the remaining Typhoon veterans on the west coast would gather. He invited me to stay at his home in Vancouver and together we drove his ‘70’s station wagon, which had over 750,000 km on it, to the ferry terminal. It ran beautifully. The Barbecue with all those incredible heroes was unforgettable.

I’ll always remember Harry’s sense of humour. You could not be around Harry for more than a minute without laughing. When we arrived, one of the gentlemen who was supposed to be there was not. Someone informed Harry that he had passed away. Harry thought for a moment and then said “Oh…I guess we’ll excuse him then. But that’s the only excuse I’ll accept.”

Harry flew 96 combat missions in the Typhoon, far more than he was required to fly. His reasoning was that the most dangerous ones were the first few so he would not endanger some new pilot when he could do it. He was not only a great warrior but a great engineer who added several successful patents to his name after the war.

The last time I spoke with Harry he was complaining that he didn’t have a girlfriend anymore and that he was off to the legion to find one.

Harry left us this year but he left the world in a better place than he found it. Farewell Harry, you are missed. Day approaching I thought I would like to share my experience with one of the greatest men I’ve ever met. While searching for Typhoon pilot veterans for a new art project, a friend recommended Harry Hardy (second from the left). What a fortunate find he was.

He spoke with me on the phone for hours helping define what one of these missions was like and sent loads priceless information by mail. He knew I had no money at the time for travel so he and four of his comrades jumped in a van and drove all the way from Vancouver to Edmonton to see the work in progress. They spent an entire evening helping me visualize what such a battle was like.

A year later when the project was finally complete Harry invited me to a Barbecue on Vancouver Island where all of the remaining Typhoon veterans on the west coast would gather. He invited me to stay at his home in Vancouver and together we drove his ‘70’s station wagon, which had over 750,000 km on it, to the ferry terminal. It ran beautifully. The Barbecue with all those incredible heroes was unforgettable.

I’ll always remember Harry’s sense of humour. You could not be around Harry for more than a minute without laughing. When we arrived, one of the gentlemen who was supposed to be there was not. Someone informed Harry that he had passed away. Harry thought for a moment and then said “Oh…I guess we’ll excuse him then. But that’s the only excuse I’ll accept.”

Harry flew 96 combat missions in the Typhoon, far more than he was required to fly. His reasoning was that the most dangerous ones were the first few so he would not endanger some new pilot when he could do it. He was not only a great warrior but a great engineer who added several successful patents to his name after the war.

The last time I spoke with Harry he was complaining that he didn’t have a girlfriend anymore and that he was off to the legion to find one.

Harry left us this year but he left the world in a better place than he found it. Farewell Harry, you are missed.

He spoke with me on the phone for hours helping define what one of these missions was like and sent loads priceless information by mail. He knew I had no money at the time for travel so he and four of his comrades jumped in a van and drove all the way from Vancouver to Edmonton to see the work in progress. They spent an entire evening helping me visualize what such a battle was like.

A year later when the project was finally complete Harry invited me to a Barbecue on Vancouver Island where all of the remaining Typhoon veterans on the west coast would gather. He invited me to stay at his home in Vancouver and together we drove his ‘70’s station wagon, which had over 750,000 km on it, to the ferry terminal. It ran beautifully. The Barbecue with all those incredible heroes was unforgettable.

I’ll always remember Harry’s sense of humour. You could not be around Harry for more than a minute without laughing. When we arrived, one of the gentlemen who was supposed to be there was not. Someone informed Harry that he had passed away. Harry thought for a moment and then said “Oh…I guess we’ll excuse him then. But that’s the only excuse I’ll accept.”

Harry flew 96 combat missions in the Typhoon, far more than he was required to fly. His reasoning was that the most dangerous ones were the first few so he would not endanger some new pilot when he could do it. He was not only a great warrior but a great engineer who added several successful patents to his name after the war.

The last time I spoke with Harry he was complaining that he didn’t have a girlfriend anymore and that he was off to the legion to find one.

Harry left us this year but he left the world in a better place than he found it.
Farewell Harry, you are missed. " 2020

 

Operation Varsity - Crossing the Rhine - Len Krenzler

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